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post #21 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 04:27 PM
 
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B4000 have you gave thought to using your left over saw dust to insulate the walls ?
Right now at work we are insulating a 60'x80' shop that has 12" walls, we are using 2x6 on there side and putting saw dust behind the 2x6 for insulation. The shop is heated with 2 hot water raditator heaters, the cieling has plywood with r20 pink insulation and 4 industrial vents.

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post #22 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 04:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BlairTruck View Post
i have been thinking of jackhammering out the pad and pouring new with in floor heat. anyone done anything like this.?
If you do this I would cut around the outside walls as close as you can, dig down and put 2' blue Styrofoam vertical into the ground and then cover the entire area with the same before putting the radiant tubing and cement in.

This is what the guy's who did my heating and floor recommended.

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post #23 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 06:20 PM
 
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post #24 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 12:13 AM Thread Starter
 
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B4000 have you gave thought to using your left over saw dust to insulate the walls ?
Right now at work we are insulating a 60'x80' shop that has 12" walls, we are using 2x6 on there side and putting saw dust behind the 2x6 for insulation. The shop is heated with 2 hot water raditator heaters, the cieling has plywood with r20 pink insulation and 4 industrial vents.
That's certainly an old-school way to insulate. My 1948 house has wood chips in the exterior walls and attic for insulation.

The problem with the walls, though, is that it settles over time. I'm pretty sure the woodchips probably don't even go halfway up now. At some point, previous owners have added styrofoam over the exterior stucco, and vinyl siding over the styro. That seems to work okay.

The other thing is that the construction of my garage probably didn't even generate enough sawdust to fill up half of a 5 gal. bucket!

I've roughly priced out what it would cost me to do the conventional fiberglass/vapour barrier/drywall method, and it's actually pretty affordable.

Another way would be to get foam sprayed directly onto the inside of the sheathing, between the studs. That's becoming popular for residential applications, I've noticed. No idea what it would cost, but it would be done in a day, and I don't think I'd even bother with drywall if the stuff is somewhat flame-retardant. I'd guess even an inch or two would make a huge difference.

But as I've mentioned before, I've got several reasons for leaving it uninsulated for now. Mainly, it's only going to need heat occasionally while I'm doing something in there in the winter, and I'd be worried about condensation in a sealed envelope when it cools down (rusty tool$, vehicle, etc.). Better cold and dry than cold and wet.

I've tried out my kerosene heater with a CO detector, and it didn't even register after almost an hour. Mind you, I'm probably still breathing in the particulate matter, but that's why God gave us two lungs -- one is a spare. Starting my truck in the garage makes it read over 120 PPM after about 3 minutes, with the tailpipe about 5' away from the detector. So that's saying something.

It should keep things pretty toasty. The only drawback is it smells a bit and it's a little on the loud side. I think it'll be pretty cheap to run, though.

BTW, I found a bulk source of kerosene in Edmonton, if anyone needs it. It's Mohawk Fuel Products (google it). $1.25/litre (jet fuel turned out to be $1.50/litre). That's a LOT cheaper than buying it in jugs at $25/10 litres. They also have bulk solvent (varsol), which can be handy.

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post #25 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 12:21 AM
 
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my buddy just had an estimate done for the spray on insulation for his house. Right now his house which is actually an old cottage is built with 2x3's for the walls. his house is 28x48 and currently has no drywall. His estimate was $8600!!



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post #26 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
 
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my pad has a big crack in it. in the winter it raises the middle so my garage door dosnt close on the side. quick sketch

i have been thinking of jackhammering out the pad and pouring new with in floor heat. anyone done anything like this.?
Good luck with that jackhammer if you've got rebar in there. But if it's that bad, it sounds like they didn't use any rebar at all. The pad isn't just cracked -- it's broken right in half.

If your crack is that bad and, sagging at the sides, that means your walls are going to be buckling, or at least a bit uneven (assuming the garage is built on top of the pad).

If that's the case, I wouldn't put a nickle into anything other than the bare minimum of repairs -- ie. no fancy in-floor heating. Save it for when you build a new garage, that has a properly built pad.

That leaves you with a couple of options. Since the cracked floor rises, you may be able to get the pad mud-jacked, and repair the crack, once everthing is flattened out. Mud jacking is when they inject concrete under the existing pad to hydraulically force it level. This would help straighten the garage walls. If they're stucco, expect them to crack in places, but that's just cosmetic.

The other, simpler, option IMO, is get a concrete grinder in to shave off some of the concrete around the door, and make it flatter just in that area. Hopefully the pad is thick enough that you've got enough material that can be removed. Then just patch the crack as best you can.

Finally, you could either cut the bottom panel of the door to match the uneveness (if it's a wood door), and install a new bottom gasket, or you could add some material to the ends of the door to cover the gaps. I assume you've got a steel door, so maybe some tapered 2x4 pieces screwed to the bottom at either end, with new gasket run along the entire width of the door. Then paint your wood to match the door.

Not the greatest fix, but it's cheap and it'll keep the mice out.

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post #27 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-03-2011, 08:55 PM
 
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sorry i know this is an old topic but...
b4000, i was in the same boat and ended up buying same redi heater but fueled by propane. works great, not too stinky but loud and high moisture content.
I polied the ceiling with 6mil and heat retention is much imporve, then I polied the walls, works even better. a summer later I insulated ceiling & wall.
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post #28 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-03-2011, 09:44 PM Thread Starter
 
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Yeah, I think I'm heading that way, too. I underestimated how much moisture the combustion would give off, and it's pretty bad. Not really stinky and no problem with CO, but the water vapour is deal-breaker. I don't need that condensing on all my tools and stuff. It's probably not too good for the OSB, either.

I bought a cheap 4800W construction heater on sale, as well. I calculated the $/BTU cost of electricity is much cheaper than diesel. I'd have to insulate to have any hope of heating with electricity, though. So I think that's the way it's going to go, eventually.

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post #29 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-03-2011, 09:53 PM
 
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Do you know where you could pick up a house gas furnace and change to orfis to propane, or do you have room in your garage to have that sit in there on the floor ?

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post #30 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-03-2011, 10:05 PM
 
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Good luck with that jackhammer if you've got rebar in there. But if it's that bad, it sounds like they didn't use any rebar at all. The pad isn't just cracked -- it's broken right in half.

If your crack is that bad and, sagging at the sides, that means your walls are going to be buckling, or at least a bit uneven (assuming the garage is built on top of the pad).

If that's the case, I wouldn't put a nickle into anything other than the bare minimum of repairs -- ie. no fancy in-floor heating. Save it for when you build a new garage, that has a properly built pad.

That leaves you with a couple of options. Since the cracked floor rises, you may be able to get the pad mud-jacked, and repair the crack, once everthing is flattened out. Mud jacking is when they inject concrete under the existing pad to hydraulically force it level. This would help straighten the garage walls. If they're stucco, expect them to crack in places, but that's just cosmetic.

The other, simpler, option IMO, is get a concrete grinder in to shave off some of the concrete around the door, and make it flatter just in that area. Hopefully the pad is thick enough that you've got enough material that can be removed. Then just patch the crack as best you can.

Finally, you could either cut the bottom panel of the door to match the uneveness (if it's a wood door), and install a new bottom gasket, or you could add some material to the ends of the door to cover the gaps. I assume you've got a steel door, so maybe some tapered 2x4 pieces screwed to the bottom at either end, with new gasket run along the entire width of the door. Then paint your wood to match the door.

Not the greatest fix, but it's cheap and it'll keep the mice out.
what i have done right now is just put the black pipe insulation tube stapled to the bottom of the door and then cut down to match.
i will eventually try the grinder option but its hard because when its warm enough for me to be motivated to work the floor isnt as heaved.

I do have a wood door that i could match to the floor. but i am planning on removing this one and putting on a nice insulated door.

No worries of walls shifting or anthing like that, it only raise a minor amount in the winter








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Last edited by BlairTruck; 01-03-2011 at 10:19 PM.
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