FordTough.ca - Home of Canadian Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Reply to Topic
Thread: NEED HELP: The Oil Conundrum Synthetic or Conventional Reply to Thread
Your Username: Click here to log in
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options
Rate Thread
If you like, you can add a score for this thread.

  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-09-2012 08:42 PM
hyperhad I'll follow manufacturers recommended parts. Can't go wrong. Semi-synthetic.
06-08-2012 03:19 AM
b4000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaak View Post
Sounds like your mind is made up. What ever floats your boat. Spend some time with Google to research the subject.
My mind is made up for the time being, barring any compelling reason to change it, which I'm quite open to.

And I have done Google "research". That's my whole point. Beyond vague anecdotes, I have found no hint that there exists any credible data from repeatable tests which show synthetic oil increases fuel mileage, or has significant effect on engine wear on an otherwise properly maintained passenger vehicle. (not Corvettes, Porsches, Formula 1 cars, or rail dragsters) None. Zero. Zip. Nada. If you can tell me where I can find it, then I'd be much obliged.

Quote:
I got into it with the IROC Camero serise racing in 1986-88 as my BIL was a crew cheif for one of the drivers. I got to see what a difference it make and have gone with it ever since.
Hey, it's your money, and I wouldn't dream of telling you how to spend it. If you believe you get some benefit from using synthetic oil, you certainly don't need to justify it to me. All I'm saying is I'm skeptical of the claims and the reasons for my skepticsm. This is, after all, a discussion forum -- not an echo-chamber.

Now, back to my hookers and blow!
06-08-2012 12:21 AM
Jaak Sounds like your mind is made up. What ever floats your boat. Spend some time with Google to research the subject. I got into it with the IROC Camero serise racing in 1986-88 as my BIL was a crew cheif for one of the drivers. I got to see what a difference it make and have gone with it ever since.

Since your mind is set ... I'll drop it ...
06-07-2012 07:37 AM
b4000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaak View Post
Corvette uses it straight from the factory.
Yes, well I can see why they would do that -- because, obviously, people who buy Corvettes are really concerned about fuel economy, and they expect to put 400K on the engine, minimum, before they trade them in.

Corvettes are considered the the workhorse of the landscaping and construction industries ... or so I've heard.
06-07-2012 07:27 AM
b4000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaak View Post
A few links ...
None of those links cite any actual data. Most of it is manufacturer marketing talk, and the first link is just some guy speculating like everyone else.

The Car Craft article simply talks about switching to a lower viscosity. Of course that will reduce drag on the engine -- regardless if it's synthetic or not. And if I inflate my tires to 150 PSI, I imagine that would decrease rolling resistance, too.

Consider this: If synthetic oil manufacturers could actually prove their product significantly increased fuel mileage, then you'd certainly hear about it in their advertising, non-stop. But, unfortunately for them, there's those party-pooper lawyers and consumer protection regulators who would come after them for false advertising, if they did.

Just as cigarette companies can't advertise that their "Light" cigarettes cause fewer lung tumours, at the same time they certainly won't discourage anyone from making that false inference. And so, they continue to sell "Light" cigarettes based on their imaginary benefits. There's no law against your customers having an imagination, is there?

And as for engine wear -- that's pretty much a non-problem in modern vehicles. The engine is already the longest lasting part, no matter what kind of oil you use. Now if only synthetic oil could prevent the tires from going bald, the radiator from leaking, or the fenders from rusting out ...
06-06-2012 11:54 PM
Jaak
Quote:
Originally Posted by b4000 View Post
Wartburg -- that was a European car, wasn't it?

Anyone want to buy a mid-80's BMW? How about a used Audi or Mercedes? Not me, thanks.

Let's face it, a lot of European cars have had horrible reputations for reliability. So I wouldn't put too much stock in what European cars use, if that's supposed to be an endorsement for what kind of motor oil I buy.

Not every vehicle is a Porsche. I bought my truck on purpose. Cheap to buy -- and cheap to own. I intend to keep it that way. Every dollar I don't spend on exotic and unnecessary stuff is a dollar in my pocket -- or a dollar I can spend on hookers and blow.

Of course this is all a matter of opinion, but I like to at least pretend I can base my opinion on real, factual data. As of yet I haven't heard anything but hearsay about all the wonderful life-giving properties of synthetic oil. Everybody seems to *think* it improves fuel mileage; everybody *claims* it increases engine life -- but no actual data. Just anectdotes.

Give me some proven hard data that synthetic oil actually delivers the claimed benefits and will save me money, then I'll be buying it.
Corvette uses it straight from the factory.

But, as I said earlier, to each their own. If you want to spend it on hookers & blow ... hey, whatever floats yer boat ... NTTIAWWT ...
06-06-2012 11:50 PM
Jaak A few links ...

http://www.dailyfueleconomytip.com/u...r-gas-mileage/

http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...Motor_Oil.aspx

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles...oil/index.html From this site: But claims and talk are cheap, so Car Craft had Westech Performance run some of the new Mobil 1 0W-30 in Ford's prototype 392 small-block stroker crate engine. The Mobil 1 was compared to the generic (and recommended for this engine) 20W-50 factory-fill conventional oil, as well as 10W-30 conventional oil. All tests began with the oil temperature stabilized at 210 degrees F. The engine ran from 3,300-6,200 rpm, and several runs were made for each oil to ensure repeatability.

In terms of peak numbers, we found that the engine gained nearly 7 hp with the thinner conventional oil, and was up nearly 10 hp with the synthetic. No peak torque gains were observed by changing from 20W-50 to 10W-30 conventional; however, the synthetic was up 15 lb-ft of torque at the peak. Looking at average numbers helps explain where the gains occurred--both the thinner conventional and synthetic oils broadened the torque and power bands overall, but the thin Mobil 1 showed the greatest improvement under 4,700 rpm, indicating that the thinner oil provides less initial drag for the engine to overcome.

However, thinner oil also translates to lower oil pressure: The 0W-30 oil developed 10 psi less than the baseline 20W-50. Only 46 psi was on tap at 6,200 rpm--kind of shaky as most gearheads like to see at least 10 psi per 1,000 rpm. Still, the engine ran OK, and the bearings looked fine on teardown, seemingly verifying synthetic manufacturers' claims that their products' greater shear strength more than makes up for lower viscosity. Is 10 hp and 15 lb-ft worth paying two to four times more for a quart of oil? Or the potential for extended engine life? You be the judge.


Read more: http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles...#ixzz1x4VFaow9

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/secti...tentId=7052294


One of the reasons the Euro cars "fail" is because the majority of the owners lease them and do NOT service them. I have seen many at friends shop that were off lease and someone bought it. I would NOT buy a used lease vehicle as they are the worst kept out there.
06-06-2012 06:08 AM
SVT4MT
Quote:
Originally Posted by b4000 View Post
... Every dollar I don't spend on exotic and unnecessary stuff is a dollar in my pocket -- or a dollar I can spend on hookers and blow.
LMFAO.
06-06-2012 04:39 AM
b4000
Quote:
I could not understand why someone would buy an expensive vehicle such as a $100K Mercedes and go to Can Tire and buy New Gold oil ... cheapest out there.
My guess is that people who are in a financial position to buy a $100K car didn't get there by being loose with their money in the first place.

Alternately, anyone who can afford a $100K car probably isn't too concerned about depreciation, and I'd be surprised if they didn't buy themselves a new one every year or two, just for kicks.
06-06-2012 04:29 AM
b4000
Quote:
Many European cars use nothing but synthetic.
Wartburg -- that was a European car, wasn't it?

Anyone want to buy a mid-80's BMW? How about a used Audi or Mercedes? Not me, thanks.

Let's face it, a lot of European cars have had horrible reputations for reliability. So I wouldn't put too much stock in what European cars use, if that's supposed to be an endorsement for what kind of motor oil I buy.

Not every vehicle is a Porsche. I bought my truck on purpose. Cheap to buy -- and cheap to own. I intend to keep it that way. Every dollar I don't spend on exotic and unnecessary stuff is a dollar in my pocket -- or a dollar I can spend on hookers and blow.

Of course this is all a matter of opinion, but I like to at least pretend I can base my opinion on real, factual data. As of yet I haven't heard anything but hearsay about all the wonderful life-giving properties of synthetic oil. Everybody seems to *think* it improves fuel mileage; everybody *claims* it increases engine life -- but no actual data. Just anectdotes.

Give me some proven hard data that synthetic oil actually delivers the claimed benefits and will save me money, then I'll be buying it.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome