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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
whats it for 2010 ranger 2.3L? doing some research and it looks like around 20 lbs for around a 2000 ranger. I have a tendency to overtighten things. those plugs are tack welded into the pan and its easy to spin them out with over tightening. Any idea for a 2010?
 

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No idea..but i would just snug it with a 3/8 ratchet..that's all i use on my 150.
 

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What N.S. said. It's a plug, not a fastener, so you don't need to crank down on it hard. The gasket makes the seal, not the threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a tendency to overtighten, so I like to have an idea. I'd rather have it tight then wiggle loose down the highway, you know those canadian tire oil changes you heard about where the guy forgot to tighten the oil plug , after he filled her up.

actually it happened to a buddy with a oil filter. O yea.
 

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I hear you. But all things considered, I'd rather lose a drain plug than strip the threads. Really, like Northern Supercrew said, anything more than hand-tight (snug) with a 3/8" ratchet is counterproductive. The soft copper or aluminum gasket also acts as a lockwasher.

You just need to tighten down enough to compress it slightly to make the seal. That's why you need to replace them every so often, too, because they eventually flatten out. If you over-compress any type of gasket, it loses its resilience and won't seal properly.
 

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well said. But the last drain plug I'd ever want to lose is the oil drain plug cause there goes your motor
Not necessarily. You'll know as soon as you lose oil pressure. Just pull over. I'm pretty sure with a good quality oil most engines nowadays can run fine for a few minutes with no oil in the pan. I think you'd really have to thrash it to do any serious damage or seize it. There's enough oil film on the parts to at least get you to the side of the road, and then some.

Remember that old TV commercial for Duralube, where they run a car around a track with no oil pressure? That was a gimmick. Pretty much any engine can do that under light load. Duralube or not.

In fact, years ago I worked with a guy who's wife drove their VW diesel Rabbit for 100 km without oil. She thought the best thing to do would be to drive home really fast when the oil pressure warning light came on. By the time she got home, there was no oil in the sump at all. But after they fixed whatever made it lose oil, that old car was fine. It ran like it never happened, for a few more years, as far as I know.

Yeah, I know, driving without oil in the pan is probably not the best thing to do, but I don't think it's the freak-out emergency it's usually made out to be -- unless you're driving a really high-performance car like a Ferrari, or something.

And, come to think of it, at least there's a warning light if you lose engine oil pressure. If the plug fell out of your diff or transfer case, you wouldn't know about it until the damage was done. So, on that note, I rather lose the engine oil drain plug, than any of the others.
 

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I just thought of another answer for age's original question.
My dad's old rule of thumb, which he learned as an young apprentice in Germany:

"Force it until it snaps -- then back-off a quarter turn."

See? Nothing like that "old world craftsmanship"! :icon_surprised:
 
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